michaelbussell:

roxanaazar:

coreyolsen:

oranbeg:

Oranbeg Press is proud to release our first annual for NET exhibitions NET TEN.

Curated by Max Marshall and featuring:  Collin AveryRoxana AzarSergiy BarchukMichael BussellCasey James WilsonCorey Olsen and Robin Myers.

Big thanks to Max for creating a really great and special show with these amazing artists!

Make sure to check out the PDF!

Also, here is a special link to download NET 1 through 10 in one go.

Excited to be included in such a great collection of work. Check out the PDF for more ! Thank you Max Marshall and Oranbeg Press

10 Oct 2014 / Reblogged from michaelbussell with 160 notes / friends 





Issue 3 will be here.

Issue 3 will be here.

9 Oct 2014 / 4 notes / events 





Curran Hatleberg

Curran Hatleberg





photographsonthebrain:

© Jeff Rich, from the series “The Watershed Project - The French Broad River”

"Sequencing can be very difficult. I find it is especially difficult with my own work. I have no problem sequencing other people’s work though! The biggest questions I have are about tone and repetition. I need the sequencing to have a consistent tone, sometimes two images that should work next to each other just have a different tone and I have to re-sequence."

(via fototazo: Editing with Jeff Rich)

photographsonthebrain:

© Jeff Rich, from the series “The Watershed Project - The French Broad River”

"Sequencing can be very difficult. I find it is especially difficult with my own work. I have no problem sequencing other people’s work though! The biggest questions I have are about tone and repetition. I need the sequencing to have a consistent tone, sometimes two images that should work next to each other just have a different tone and I have to re-sequence."

(via fototazo: Editing with Jeff Rich)

8 Oct 2014 / Reblogged from photographsonthebrain with 174 notes / photography issue 3 sequencing america 





sergiybarchuk:

christopherleaman:

Serg in Big Sur

me by chris

sergiybarchuk:

christopherleaman:

Serg in Big Sur

me by chris

7 Oct 2014 / Reblogged from sergiybarchuk with 42 notes / photography friends 





mpdrolet:

From Israeli Girls
Dafy Hagai

mpdrolet:

From Israeli Girls

Dafy Hagai

7 Oct 2014 / Reblogged from tylerlongphoto with 621 notes / photography portraits 





vicemag:

Hailing from the picturesque Catskill mountains, photographer Juan Madrid takes intimate portraits of the seemingly unapproachable as he chronicles and humanizes the once-great and now-fallen cities and towns of America. Focusing mainly on the quieter moments of these regions that haven’t been covered by major media outlets, Madrid allows us to feel these places like we haven’t before. We talked to Juan about rampant poverty, knife fights, and the problems with new growth in old cities. 

New interview is up!

6 Oct 2014 / Reblogged from vicemag with 316 notes / photography america interviews vice 





PBS Self Destructs

‘Night after night,’ [Bill] Moyers told me, ‘the realities of life for the vast majority of Americans rarely show up on public television — neither on its public-affairs programming nor its prime-time fare. There has been one documentary all year on the flailing middle class and the forgotten poor. Our Washington coverage, by design or not, serves up ‘news’ the way the butler serves tea on Downton Abbey, so as not to disturb the master class. Even my friends at WETA, our flagship station in Washington, passed up the award-winning documentary Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth to air instead another episode of Antiques Roadshow and a program about the British royal family. And PBS has commissioned a series for next year, using U.S. taxpayer funds, on the ‘great homes’ of Great Britain. Not on homelessness in America. Unbelievable!’

Read more (via jmcolberg: PBS Pulls Ads from Harpers Magazine after Critical Essay)





terryaratzlaff:

9.15.2014

The Tide Goes North

I’m more than excited to release this years body of work from spending six weeks in SW Alaska documenting a small salmon fishing culture. This is the continuation of last years work, Nushagak Point, and I feel it is the best work I’ve done to date.  More coming soon.

Made using Kodak Professional Films

4 Oct 2014 / Reblogged from terryaratzlaff with 96 notes / photography america 





Stephen Shore, Mar Saba Monastery, Judean Desert, Israel, 2009

Now, I know this may sound like the gushing of a fan boy over his favorite band getting back together to play the hits and relive there glory days. But Shore uses his often-dry approach to the world to transform two very potentially fraught political situations, Israel and the Ukraine, into something human and relatable. In the photographs, Israel seems shockingly large and empty. It is hard to see the ancient cities surrounded by large expanses of desert and not find the area’s conflict all the more perplexing. It’s a perfect example of things that the camera can show, lots of space that can clearly accommodate two very similar peoples, even with their fraught history. Shore’s trademark dryness is the perfect temperament to get a reasonable sense of the place, which so often is only shown through a constant haze of hysteria. The Israel images are matched with a grid of pictures from the Ukraine that don’t speak at all to the Orange Revolution or the ousting of a president, and outside of a Lenin bust jammed onto a shelf there is no hint of Russia’s influence, much less an invasion. What you do get is a view of a contemporary rural lifestyle that doesn’t feel that removed from the 60’s or even the post World War II era when Jews fled the Eastern Europe to form the State of Israel. The work is just so good that it makes me very happy.

Review by Carl Gunhouse

Stephen Shore, Mar Saba Monastery, Judean Desert, Israel, 2009

Now, I know this may sound like the gushing of a fan boy over his favorite band getting back together to play the hits and relive there glory days. But Shore uses his often-dry approach to the world to transform two very potentially fraught political situations, Israel and the Ukraine, into something human and relatable. In the photographs, Israel seems shockingly large and empty. It is hard to see the ancient cities surrounded by large expanses of desert and not find the area’s conflict all the more perplexing. It’s a perfect example of things that the camera can show, lots of space that can clearly accommodate two very similar peoples, even with their fraught history. Shore’s trademark dryness is the perfect temperament to get a reasonable sense of the place, which so often is only shown through a constant haze of hysteria. The Israel images are matched with a grid of pictures from the Ukraine that don’t speak at all to the Orange Revolution or the ousting of a president, and outside of a Lenin bust jammed onto a shelf there is no hint of Russia’s influence, much less an invasion. What you do get is a view of a contemporary rural lifestyle that doesn’t feel that removed from the 60’s or even the post World War II era when Jews fled the Eastern Europe to form the State of Israel. The work is just so good that it makes me very happy.

Review by Carl Gunhouse





Out of ice, 35 thousand walruses scramble for the shore in Alaska. (Corey Accardo for Reuters)

Out of ice, 35 thousand walruses scramble for the shore in Alaska. (Corey Accardo for Reuters)





nburbeck:

A few weeks ago I finally received my copy of Mossless’ Issue 3: The United States (2003-2013). It’s an incredibly ambitious photo book of more than 200 pages and contains the work of 118 great photographers from the all across the US and elsewhere whose work focuses on documentary photography and the American social landscape during the last decade. In addition to Issue 3 being an invaluable addition to my modest but growing art book library I also have a little bit of personal pride in this book. Romke Hoogwaerts (who along with Grace Leigh runs Mossless) wrote this in his introduction to the book on page 6: 

"…These photographs were all sourced from the internet, chosen intentionally, not submitted. Many of the photographers we found were made visible to us by a few dedicated bloggers…a prodigious Nate Burbeck even maintained a collection of blogs dedicated to providing exposure to young artists from every quarter of the county."…"Their contributions to the internet made this book possible and here I will proudly thank them! It is to people like them, and every photographer that decided to share their work, that we owe our gratitude of experiencing so much."

The blogs Romke is referring to are part of my regional art blog project here on tumblr that I ran for a little over a year (fly over art, beyond 9th ave, in the new frontier, and dim with beauty). Many of the photographers featured in Issue 3 were previously featured on one of those regional blogs and were thus found by Mossless. I was unaware of this at the time that I was maintaining those blogs (that is, until I discontinued them) but I am so thrilled that the work I put into them eventually helped in a small way to make such a beautiful book. Mossless has gotten a lot of great press in anticipation for the book, all of which is well deserved. I hope that recognition of their efforts only continues to grow, not only for Mossless but also for all of the incredibly talented photographers featured in the book, many of whom I consider to be influential on my own work in painting. It’s thrilling for me to say that I can associate myself with a great project like this (and great people) and to know that artists really can reach out and help their peers gain the recognition and exposure they and their work deserve. Best of luck to Romke, Grace, and all the photographers featured in Issue 3. You all have bright futures ahead of you and I can’t wait to see what comes next.

If you haven’t picked up your own copy of The United States (2003-2013) I highly recommend doing so. You will not be disappointed.

- Nate

Not mentioning you would’ve been unethical! Thank you for your kindness, Nate. You rule.

30 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from nburbeck with 58 notes / issue 3 news 





Sander Meisner





Michael George

Michael George

(Source: booooooom.com)

29 Sep 2014 / 22 notes / photography 





msnbcphoto:

As wildfires blaze throughout California, Washington state has endured a cataclysmic wildfire season of its own. A series of fires in central and eastern Washington have made 2014 one of the most destructive wildfire seasons on record. Most notable was the Carlton Complex fire, which began as four small fires ignited by lighting in mid-July. The fires spread quickly and combined. It went on to burn 256,108 acres, according to the U.S. Forest Service.  Nearly 300 homes were destroyed in the fire’s path.

Witnessing the aftermath first-hand, Seattle-based photographer Ian C. Bates drove through the affected areas in July, surveying the destruction.

Click here for the full photo essay

29 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from msnbcphoto with 83 notes / photography