Marshall Scheider

Marshall Scheider





mpdrolet:

Savannah, GA, 2003
Martin Buday

I don’t really remember how old I (Grace) was when my father brought home a giant print of this image but it couldn’t have been that long before his death. My father proudly hung it above the couch in our living room, the focal point of the room, and delighted in telling guests that he used to get his film developed there before he had his darkroom. When my friends would come over I’d point to it and say “you’ve got one guess, where was this taken?” Later, I’d take them to the alley where this scene lived— about two blocks away from my house, almost as perfectly as in the photograph. An untouched relic of the Savannah we’d all heard about from our parents, but rarely saw. I never really realized it but this image opened up a new world to my friends and I. We started exploring back alleys, old buildings and things forgotten- the old Savannah, just tucked slightly behind the new one. Continuing this exploration camera in hand after he died helped me feel closer to him.
In searching for images to feature in Issue 3, Martin Buday’s work was one of the first we came across, and completely by chance. I hadn’t seen the image since we packed up the house, but I thought about it often. Clicking through the images, there it was. I just about jumped out of my skin. I’m pretty sure I started pacing behind the computer table. We ultimately decided not to feature the image in the book, it was a little too emotional for me. But seeing this image so early on in the process, and the conversations that surrounded it really helped Romke and I realize our direction with Issue 3. Seeing it here really takes me back and I don’t think that will ever go away. 

mpdrolet:

Savannah, GA, 2003

Martin Buday

I don’t really remember how old I (Grace) was when my father brought home a giant print of this image but it couldn’t have been that long before his death. My father proudly hung it above the couch in our living room, the focal point of the room, and delighted in telling guests that he used to get his film developed there before he had his darkroom. When my friends would come over I’d point to it and say “you’ve got one guess, where was this taken?” Later, I’d take them to the alley where this scene lived— about two blocks away from my house, almost as perfectly as in the photograph. An untouched relic of the Savannah we’d all heard about from our parents, but rarely saw. I never really realized it but this image opened up a new world to my friends and I. We started exploring back alleys, old buildings and things forgotten- the old Savannah, just tucked slightly behind the new one. Continuing this exploration camera in hand after he died helped me feel closer to him.

In searching for images to feature in Issue 3, Martin Buday’s work was one of the first we came across, and completely by chance. I hadn’t seen the image since we packed up the house, but I thought about it often. Clicking through the images, there it was. I just about jumped out of my skin. I’m pretty sure I started pacing behind the computer table. We ultimately decided not to feature the image in the book, it was a little too emotional for me. But seeing this image so early on in the process, and the conversations that surrounded it really helped Romke and I realize our direction with Issue 3. Seeing it here really takes me back and I don’t think that will ever go away. 

28 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from mpdrolet with 408 notes / photography america issue 3 





maciekjasik:

Meagan Cignoli for Wired magazine © Maciek Jasik / Instagram / Tumblr / Twitter

maciekjasik:

Meagan Cignoli for Wired magazine © Maciek Jasik / Instagram / Tumblr / Twitter

27 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from maciekjasik with 17 notes / photography vine 





Josh Sinn

Josh Sinn





Nick Ray McCann

Nick Ray McCann

26 Jul 2014 / 37 notes / photography 





Lost Home by Christian Patterson





Rob Brulinski and Alex Wein photographed Baltimore’s “factory-turned-artist-residence” The Copycat. 

Feature Shoot: How did you decide who to photograph, and what are their stories?
Rob Brulinski: Every resident, including ourselves, were photographed. It would have been distrustful to pick and choose. The universal story I took away from the residents were their sense of pride with creating art without a purpose beyond the sake of creation. My neighbors were magicians. There’s a theatre/concert space down the hall and exhibition space upstairs. All DIY.

Read the rest of their interview at Feature Shoot





andrewmaclean:

What self publishing does to your house. There is two more rooms of this.

andrewmaclean:

What self publishing does to your house. There is two more rooms of this.





whittensabbatini:

I’m excited to announce that a few of my photographs and a brief interview will be included in Aint-Bad Magazine Issue No. 8: The American South

I’m completely humbled to have my work next to all of these talented folks: Cody CobbAshley JonesTommy KhaJoe LeavenworthSara MacelCaitlin PetersonWalker PickeringJeff RichClementine SchneidermannBrandon ThibodeauxColin Todd & Keith Yahrling

23 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from whittensabbatini with 79 notes / photography america 





Printed Matter’s having a big sale for a week starting this Thursday and a bunch of books are going to be 40% off.

Printed Matter’s having a big sale for a week starting this Thursday and a bunch of books are going to be 40% off.

22 Jul 2014 / 8 notes / events 





Sebastian Collett

Sebastian Collett





wandering-bears:

Vitus Saloshanka

wandering-bears:

Vitus Saloshanka

22 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from wandering-bears with 185 notes / photography 





(continued from an earlier mailbox post)

We received this incredible book from Mike Osborne that quite frankly feels out of our league (let me know if I can pay you for the book, Mike), called Floating Island. It’s huge and its photographs are really beautiful. Dark, but not in the way we’re used to. 

Skylar Blum is also in Issue 3 and we really like this book by him. Sometimes perplexing in the same way modernity is nowadays. 

We also got this treasure by Joshua Edwards. It covers a walk from Galveston Island, Texas, to Marfa, taking one photo per hour. It’s a humble vernacular road trip book, except for the fact that it spans over 200 pages. It is even coupled with a poetry book that starts off quite observational and slowly becomes more abstract and political in tone, which is nice, because you feel the heightened sense of poetic self-awareness that can only arise during a long journey.

We love receiving things. Send us a postcard or a zine! Our address is on our about us page. We’ll do our best to make a timely post about whatever we receive!

20 Jul 2014 / 26 notes / mailbox 





Time for a much-overdue mailbox post. There’s a lot of books that we have received that we haven’t been able to showcase (especially those that we receive at art book fairs, still, thank you so much we love them all)… but here’s a sampling of some great ones from the last month or so.

We received anther inkjet zine from Mark Lanning Jr., titled Road Work. A couple of these photos are actually in Issue 3. Be sure to go to the link to see better photos of the book… kinda rushed these, sorry. 

Nick Childers came to our house when we weren’t home and dropped off this zine in our mailbox. Very cool. It’s a small one, but each spread juxtaposes two photographs he’s taken of similar settings.

Noel Camardo surprised us with this photo zine of life in Los Angeles. Kinda lo-fi but sincere at the same time. I always wonder what life is really like there for the majority of LA’s inhabitants.

It was a real pleasure to receive Chris Mottalini’s book After You Left/They Took It Apart (Demolished Paul Rudolf Homes), since Grace and I, beside loving some deft ruinporn, are covert architecture geeks. It’s a beautifully produced book, quite chilling too though. ISIS might be destroying architectural relics in Iraq but this book is a reminder that that’s not the only way cultural landmarks disappear. 

More to come in the next post!

20 Jul 2014 / 63 notes / mailbox 





jleav:

Come see these two prints in the Oranbeg Press Pop-Up Exhibition at 110 Meserole Ave, Brooklyn, NY, up for the next week. Opening Reception July 18th 6-midnight. Come say hello!

17 Jul 2014 / Reblogged from jleav with 68 notes / photography events